The Pryor Times

State News

April 16, 2013

Boston race draws 86 from Oklahoma

Boston race draws

86 from Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — More than 80 Oklahoma runners were registered to run in the Boston Marathon, where two explosions rocked runners and spectators near the finish line after the race.

According to the race's website, 86 runners in Monday's race listed Oklahoma as their home state. Their ages were listed as between 23 and 79 years of age.

It wasn't known whether any Oklahomans were injured.

About three hours after the winners crossed the finish line, there was a loud explosion near a photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion rang out a few seconds later.

The Federal Aviation Administration is warning pilots that it has created a no-fly zone over the site of two explosions at the annual Boston marathon.

The agency said in a notice issued Monday about an hour after the explosions that a no-fly zone with a 3.5-mile radius has been created over 811 Boylston Street. The zone is limited to flights under 3,000 feet in altitude, which is lower than most airliners would fly except when taking off or landing.

The notice says the no-fly zone is effective immediately, and will remain in effect until further notice. Pilots planning flights were urged to call their local flight service station.

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol says there have been no threats or heightened security in the aftermath of a bombing at the Boston Marathon — but that senses are heightened.

Trooper Betsy Randolph says the Boston bombing focuses attention on the scheduled April 28 Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon. Randolph says authorities have always focused on security measures around the April 19 anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing and during the marathon.

Oklahoma City Police Capt. Dexter Nelson says police have always increased security for the race and adds both on-duty and off-duty officers for the race.

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett says there are currently no plans to call off this year's Oklahoma City marathon — but said events will be monitored daily.

The Secret Service says it has expanded its security perimeter at the White House following the explosions.

Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan says the measure was taken “out of an abundance of caution.” He says it is not unusual to expand or contract the security perimeters.

Shortly after the explosions Monday, Secret Service shut down Pennsylvania Avenue outside the White House, cordoning off the area with yellow police tape. Several Secret Service patrol cars also blocked off the entry points to the road.

The White House was not on lockdown and tourists and other onlookers were still able to be in the park across the street from the executive mansion.

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