The Pryor Times

National News

October 7, 2013

Scientists find evidence of Martian supervolcanoes

We've known for a long time that Mars has volcanoes; after all, Olympus Mons on the Martian Tharsis shield is the largest volcano in the solar system.

But there may have been a more powerful menace lurking just below the red planet's surface eons ago. A paper published last week in Nature (though the authors first reported about it in March at 44th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference) claims to have found evidence of supervolcanoes on Mars.

On Earth, a supervolcano is far larger than a regular volcano; they have huge chambers of magma that can be dozens of kilometers across (like under Yellowstone). They build slowly over hundreds of thousands of years, and erupt catastrophically, and can change the landscape and climate of nearly the entire planet.

In the northern hemisphere of Mars is a series of craters that have been thought to be from impacts. Mars is littered with impact craters, since it has little atmosphere and no running water to erode away ancient features. But the craters in question, most notably Eden Patera (85 by 55 kilometers in size, or 53 by 34 miles), are a bit odd. The entire area is actually lower than average, literally sunken, which is consistent with a supervolcano; once the magma under the surface erupts out, the ground around it collapses to fill the empty space.

Other features make it suspiciously un-impact-like. The crater isn't round, it has no rim, no ejecta (material blasted out from impact), and no central peak (which are common in large craters, like Tycho on the Moon). There are substantial flows of lava around the area, and more evidence of ancient volcanism. Also, benches, or flattened rings around the inside of the crater, are present, and these are common in volcanoes as lava lakes subside.

If Eden Patera (and several other craters seen in the Arabia Terra region of Mars) are in fact supervolcanoes, this changes how we see ancient Mars. Olympus Mons, for example, probably built itself up over eons with big eruptions, but not catastrophic enough that it blew itself apart. That's why it grew to such enormous size; 600 kilometers (370 miles) wide and 22 kilometers (14 miles) tall- Mars also lacks plate tectonics, so a single volcano can just sit in one spot and grow ever larger.

But supervolcanoes explode. Gas dissolved in the magma is pressurized underground, but once it hits the surface it expands violently, creating a massive explosion. This would have distributed volcanic output like ash for thousands of kilometers across the planet. In fact, fine-grained volcanic deposits have been found across the equatorial regions of Mars that are most likely from volcanoes, but no source volcano has ever been found. Moreover, the deposits are layered, which is expected as well from episodic supervolcano explosions. Similar features are seen on Earth.

It's not certain that these craters are in fact supervolcanoes, but it would explain a lot. As we investigate more of Mars we're sure to find features that were previously unknown, and our view of the red planet will no doubt continually evolve. Perhaps we'll find evidence to support this idea of supervolcanoes; perhaps we'll find contradictory data. Either way, the only way we'll know is to keep exploring, keep looking around, and keep learning.

          

1
Text Only | Photo Reprints
National News
  • handshake.jpg What is the Employment Non-Discrimination Act?

    The Employment Non-Discrimination Act would ban employers from firing, refusing to hire or discriminating against workers or job applicants based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

    November 15, 2013 1 Photo

  • 082313obama1.jpg Obama's Gallup approval rating hits new low

    President Barack Obama's rating in the daily Gallup poll has fallen to its lowest level since October 2011 as his administration continues to be tarnished by the rocky debut of his health-care program.

    November 15, 2013 1 Photo

  • Don't sweat the death-threat tweets

    Dearest reader: I'd just like to let you know that I intend to kill you.
    Calling 911 yet? Why not? I just threatened your life! If not a police call, then my threat at least merits a blog post, right?

    November 14, 2013

  • screenshot 3d.jpg VIDEO: Smithsonian makes 3D imaging push

    The Smithsonian Institution is launching a new 3D scanning and printing initiative to make more artifacts accessible to schools, researchers and the public worldwide.

    November 14, 2013 1 Photo

  • news_supremecourt.jpg Worker-rights case asks court to define 'clothes'

    A seemingly simple phrase can sometimes become stubbornly opaque when the lawyers at the Supreme Court get to it, and that was the case Monday when the justices examined what "changing clothes" means.

    November 13, 2013 1 Photo

  • tcr RandomActs01-20131028kk04.jpg Couple begins 'kindness' journey

    Did a stranger buy your coffee this morning? Or pay your parking ticket? If so, you could be a recipient of a Michigan couple's random kindness. They're traveling part of the United States, helping as many people as they can.

    November 13, 2013 1 Photo

  • Military bases are our most exclusive gated communities

    Inside, troops and their families live and work on massive military bases, separated geographically, socially and economically from the society they serve.

    November 13, 2013

  • screenshot typhoon.jpg VIDEO: Typhoon aid operation speeds up

    U.S. troops are installing runway lights and equipment in the devastated Philippine city of Tacloban's airport, so aid can be delivered around the clock.

    November 13, 2013 1 Photo

  • Screen shot 2013-10-07 at 10.51.34 AM.png VIDEO: Young boy sneaks on plane in Minnesota, heads to Las Vegas

    A 9-year-old Minneapolis boy was able to get through security at a Twin Cities airport and get on a plane without a ticket.

    October 7, 2013 1 Photo

  • Screen shot 2013-10-04 at 4.05.36 PM.png VIDEO: Meet the woman behind the voice of Siri

    Susan Bennett started providing her voice as Siri in 2005. She first started her career as a machine playing the voice of the first ATM.

    October 7, 2013 1 Photo